Skip to main content

Alaska has highest rate of Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI) in the country, and Maryland has highest rate of Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections.


According to the latest data I could find (last updated July 2013) Alaska has the highest rate of Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI) in the country. CLABSI is only one of many hospital acquired infections. Here is the brief explanation of the data from CMS:
The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected through the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). They provide information on infections that occur while the patient is in the hospital. These infections can be related to devices, such as central lines and urinary catheters, or spread from patient to patient after contact with an infected person or surface. Many healthcare associated infections can be prevented when the hospitals use CDC-recommended infection control steps.
There are four main Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) being measured:
  1. HAI-1-SIR. Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI)
  2. HAI-2-SIR. Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI)
  3. HAI-3-SIR. Surgical Site Infections from colon surgery (SSI: Colon)
  4. HAI-4-SIR. Surgical Site Infections from abdominal hysterectomy (SSI: Hysterectomy)
There is a very good explanation of the calculation methodology for Standardized Infection Ratios (SIR) on the Leapfrog website. Essentially, Alaska's score of 1.495 means that CLABSI is 49.5% more common in Alaska than expected number for the standard population.

Why are Hospital Acquired Infections important? There are many reasons, but the key reasons are that they cause harm to patients, they are preventable, and they cost a lot of money to treat.

I've created an interactive chart where you can look into the data more closely by either bar chart or map.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Mastering Medicare Cheat Sheet

Amy Schiffman and I have created an awesome 1-page Medicare Cheat Sheet. You can get it for free by joining the Mastering Medicare subscriber list . Here's a sneak peak

How To Automatically Upload a Zoho File Attachment to Dropbox from Zoho Creator using Dropbox API v2 and Zoho postUrl

I'm an idiot, so this took about 6 hours for me to figure out, but apparently many people have not been able to figure this out, and I could not find a complete and working solution online anywhere. If you want to be able to upload a file to Dropbox from Zoho Creator, you have to create a custom function like below (here I called the function "Dropbox", under namespace "Create"). In the function, the ID is being passed to it from the underlying form entry. void Create.Dropbox(int id) { url = "https://api.dropboxapi.com/2/files/save_url"; headers = {"Authorization":"Bearer XXXXX","Content-Type":"application/json"}; data = {"path":"/FFFF/TTTT.XXX","url":"YYYY"}; datastring = data.toString(); response = postUrl(url,datastring,headers,false); } ... where XXXXX is your secret Dropbox Token, and YYYY is the url of the file you are uploading, and FFFF is the Dr

How to track CME - guest post published on Knack blog

I am happy to announce that my detailed post on how I built CMElog.org using Knack , Zapier, Dropbox, Mailchimp, Mandrill, and Google Drive has been published on the Knack blog: In this post, I dive into details of how to use Zapier to build automated services, like CMElog.org, in which medical providers' continuing medical education credits can be automatically extracted, identified, copied for back up, organized, and accessed.